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Rich in plant protein products as food for the future

The future of human nutrition presents us with several challenges.

Safety, quality, availability and food distribution are key challenges.

We will address these four themes which concerns our main activity in the development and marketing of rich in plant protein products for human consumption.

Food safety

In terms of safety it is important to ensure the traceability of the grain and seeds until harvest. This is the first step and among the risk factors are direct or indirect genetic modifications as well as contamination by pesticides or pollution. In the case of vegetable proteins that are going to be the result of an extraction process and subsequently an additional process of texturization, the existing methods must be taken into account and the pollutant or contaminant effects on the material and the environment adequately evaluated.

Food quality

Consistent and constant quality must be ensured as harvests can vary and the final product will reflect these changes. As it is a dry state product that needs to be rehydrated there is in addition to the taste factor other factors such as texture, absorption and the effect of heat to be considered. This is important from a commercial point of view to be able to provide the consumer with a stable product that will encourage repeated purchase and consumption, especially when it comes to innovative products.

Food availability and distribution

Food availability meaning being able to satisfy the food supply in a consistent manner over time. This requires sufficient and optimal storage and supply management. The distribution meaning geographical logistics but also optimal distribution. It is also important to address food waste due to the influence of purely financial interests. This becomes important because climate change is negatively impacting agricultural productivity estimates and projections. Therefore the practice of destroying surplus production to maintain prices for a current year becomes irresponsible as the forecast of the next crop may be at risk. This is not the subject of this communication but it is useful to sensitize the agri-food sector of this phenomenon.

Vegetable proteins are an effective way to address several dietary challenges at once.

The reason is the multiple added values ​​that it presents, not only at the nutritional and food level but also at the level of the cost of production, storage and transport in resources and time.

The density of vegetable proteins

Plant based protein products provide an essential nutrient but also provide the necessary protein density.This property has traditionally been reserved for animal source foods. Being able to ingest 20 or 30 grams of protein by eating a few bites of meat or cheese has been difficult so far with plant based foods. Nuts have such a density but are too rich in fat and do not lend themselves easily to culinary transformation so they are not practical as regular food options. But vegetable proteins thanks to their diversity in forms ranging from a fine powder to various textured shapes and having in addition a neutral color and a reasonably neutral taste offer very interesting possibilities. It is possible to combine them to create a variety of finished products ranging from meat-analogue products to desserts and drinks. It is these properties that will allow plant proteins to successfully substitute animal source products.

Sufficient knowledge of the effects of the consumption of cereals and legumes.

There is also another important benefit, and this is the fact that we have many centuries of hindsight on the effect of plant products on our organisms. This is very important because if we take the example of the mad cow disease we note that it is estimated that the cause is directly related to having fed cows with products of animal origin. Wheat protein is a form of bread and pasta and is a traditional food and its effects are well known. This is not true for algae or insect protein for example because we have little historic data on the effects of such a diet on a human organism.

Vegetable proteins a real solution for the future

There are many other elements that ensure that vegetable proteins and foods rich in vegetable proteins offer a real solution for the future of our species and our planet, but the few arguments detailed in this text are already sufficient indicators.

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Keto Version of our Vegan Kofta Mince mix!

 

 

One of the key advantages that our dehydrated food mixes provide is the possibility to customize them in many ways, even to prepare them as a high fat, high protein and low in carbohydrates version.

For those who would like to prepare our Vegan Mince mixes in a version that is close to a Keto calorie profile it is possible to use the following recipe in place of the recommended recipe printed on the package.

It is just as easy and only requires modifying the amount of water and oil and following the same recipe as below. We will use the Kofta recipe as an example but the same will apply for the other Vegan Mince mixes.

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Keto Version of our Vegan Gyros Flakes mix!

 

 

One of the key advantages that our dehydrated food mixes provide is the possibility to customize them in many ways, even to prepare them as a high fat, high protein and low in carbohydrates version.

For those who would like to prepare our Vegan Flakes mixes in a version that is close to a Keto calorie profile it is possible to use the following recipe in place of the recommended recipe printed on the package.

It is just as easy and only requires modifying the amount of water and oil and following the same recipe as below. We will use the Gyros recipe as an example but the same will apply for the other Vegan Flakes mixes.

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Meat or Plant?

Meat or Plant?

When having a multitude of meal options available to me why would I choose one dish in place of another? And why do I tend to repeat those same choices. I note that I make food choices multiple times daily on a regular basis and I notice that I do it very subconsciously.

It seems that it is very much based on sentiment. I choose to eat food that I feel like eating. So why do I feel like eating certain foods? I have already noted that my bodily needs tend to motivate my feelings. When I lack protein I think meat, when I lack vitamin C I think orange juice etc.

Now that I am Vegan when I need protein it does not make sense to think meat but interestingly I think avocado, nuts, beans, chocolate and similarly dense foods. But before being Vegan I would surely have thought fish, steak etc. I think the reason was mostly out of habit and taste. Basically, you can miss only what you know.

If I examine what foods I know I notice that it is almost all animal source based. A dish is almost always some animal source ingredient as a center piece surrounded by some plant-based ingredient. Vegetables are always considered as an accompaniment to some sort of animal sourced ingredient. That is why all things being equal I would choose meat in place of plant for food.

Even if I look at sandwiches it is always animal source with some vegetable. So, unless there is a conscious reason that makes me avoid meat it would never occur to me to choose a salad instead. It reminds me of Brutus in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, ‘..not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more..’

Now that I know why I would choose a steak in place of a salad for a meal I ask myself another question. If I were still an omnivore how could I make myself choose a salad in place of a steak for lunch willingly, naturally, subcounciously….

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Meat or Steak?

Meat or Steak?

Since I recently became Vegan there is still the taste of grilled meat and especially pepper steak with french fries still fresh in my memory. I became Vegan for several reasons but mainly because I felt that following a more empathetic and environment friendly life style is a good thing for me and not at all because meat had a bad taste!

I started thinking about If there was a way to have the same pleasure without eating meat. So as a first step I tried to recall the feeling in my mouth of eating a piece of grilled steak with some pepper sauce and mustard. The sensations that came most to my mind is the spicy notes of mustard and pepper covered in a creamy taste of the sauce and a salty, bitter, stiff and tender taste in the background of the meat all rounded up with the smell of grilled food.

Together I think it created what I wanted to feel when I felt like eating a pepper steak. To note I am just speaking about wanting a steak and leaving aside the fact that I wanted to eat meat as a source of low carb protein or any other nutrition-based considerations. In view of this it was easy for me to conclude that a pepper steak is a combination of various sensations. Also, when all those elements are well balanced it produces a more satisfying meal result. The reason why all pepper steaks are not born equal!

So, if I could somehow replace the piece of raw meat with some similar substance, add to it all the sensations, close my eyes and chew a mouthful of that mixture I should be able to enjoy a Vegan pepper steak. So, it seems that the piece of raw meat in the context of a grilled pepper steak is not the most important item since most of the other elements are not meat related.

Therefore, I conclude that it is steak that I crave and not necessarily meat. And steak is a sum of its flavors, odors and mouthfeel sensations. The next question that now came to my mind is to know what motivates my food choice. Why would I choose a pepper steak in place of a healthier salad for example as a lunch…….

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Meat or Protein?

Meat or Protein?

I have been asking myself this question very seriously since some time now. I need to mention that I spent most of my life being a ferocious meat eater until I became a happy and lucky Vegan recently. When I became Vegan I quickly noticed the big impact that the absence of meat in my diet had on me. I was constantly hungry and eating lots of bananas did not help much.

Since I knew that meats were very rich in protein I decided to increase my daily intake of protein by supplementing with protein shakes, bars and textured protein samples I had available. I wanted to see if it would curb my persistent hunger. Well it did, and I started to measure my daily intake in grams of protein since all the other food I ate, mostly fruits and vegetables, did not provide very significant levels. I also avoided nuts to keep from gaining too much weight.

Gradually things stabilized and by consuming 150 grams of plant protein per day I was feeling very much like my former ferocious self. This led me to start thinking about how much of the meat I used to eat was for the meat and how much of it was for the protein in the meat.

Over time I observed that the relationship is very close and when for some reason I was not getting my 150 grams daily I was starting to feel hungry all the time and since high protein vegan foods are not easily available when outside I was turning to nuts and bread and other low in protein foods which was having an energy draining effect on me.

So, my conclusion is that in my case much of the craving for meat was a craving for protein in disguise. But it cannot be that simple, so I started to look further for other factors that could explain why I used to crave a crispy, juicy, grilled, greasy and seasoned piece of meat……